Joint Project – Bridging the Tamar

£9.99

When Roger Lilley first viewed the 16mm print of Reg Blackett’s film of the building of the Tamar Road Bridge, he was so thrilled that he just had to make it into a film documentary. The images were recorded from 1959 to 1961 and Reg was able, with the permission of the contractors, to film from the top of the towers while building was in progress. His detailed script was of such interest that most of it has been included in the narration.

Description

DVD – Colour & B/W – 50 minutes

When Roger Lilley first viewed the 16mm print of Reg Blackett’s film of the building of the Tamar Road Bridge, he was so thrilled that he just had to make it into a film documentary. The images were recorded from 1959 to 1961 and Reg was able, with the permission of the contractors, to film from the top of the towers while building was in progress. His detailed script was of such interest that most of it has been included in the narration.

The unique journey of the last Saltash ferry is included, together with the official opening of the bridge by HM The Queen Mother in 1962. The film not only captures the visual images of the construction but also gives valuable insight into some of the major engineering works.

In September 1995 the bridge is due to be closed for a night for vital inspections. Aarchive’s film cameraman will be there to capture the event to round off this unique and exclusive documentary.

 

An Aarchive Film Production

Specifications

Produced & Directed by Roger D Lilley
Edited by Roger Underwood
Archive footage by Reginald D Blackett


All the DVDs are produced, packed and sent directly from Aarchvie Films.

The original documentaries were made on S-VHS, in a 4:3 ratio, so on a standard TV/computer screen, will show black bars on both sides.

There is some very brief areas of ‘dropout’ when they were converted from S-VHS video to digital. We have done the best we can to reduce this, but it is still there.

All of the documentaries were produced by Roger Lilley of Aarchive Films, who passed away 20 years ago. Some of the ‘modern’ footage is from between 1995 – 2000, so some of the newer footage may look different now.

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