Plymouth to Exeter

£9.99

When the LSW/SR ran into Devon and Cornwall, mighty steam engines crossed the national park of Dartmoor. In later years, DMUs were prominent on the line just before its closure. Now, brought to the screen with the aid of archive cine footage taken from the 1940s to the 1960s, comes this latest production from the Aarchive team.

Description

Simply head over to our Patreon Page and you can watch the new digitally re-mastered video today on your computer or smart device.
Choose a tier, subscribe for a month, watch all of the Railways Series 1 videos, then cancel if you don’t want to carry on.
On top of that, you can also see other exclusive content, behind the scene footage and more.


PLYMOUTH TO EXETER – THE SOUTHERNWAY

DVD – 36 minutes

When the LSW/SR ran into Devon and Cornwall, mighty steam engines crossed the national park of Dartmoor. In later years, DMUs were prominent on the line just before its closure. Now, brought to the screen with the aid of archive cine footage taken from the 1940s to the 1960s, comes this latest production from the Aarchive team.

Featured are all the stations from Plymouth Friary, including St Budeaux, Tamerton Foliet, Bere Ferrers, Bere Alston, Tavistock North, Brentor, Bridestowe, Meldon, Okehampton, Crediton and other stations, as they used to look and as they are today.

Also featured is the last passenger service from Exeter to Okehampton in 1972. Many of the West Country class engines are also featured. To round off the SR images, 12 minutes of superb archive steam footage is included at Southampton Central station in the 1950s.

Engines such as Axminster, Brentor and Seaton, plus a whole host of activity at Weymouth and the South.

Specifications


All the DVDs are produced, packed and sent directly from Aarchvie Films.

The original documentaries were made on S-VHS, in a 4:3 ratio, so on a standard TV/computer screen, will show black bars on both sides.

There is some very brief areas of ‘dropout’ when they were converted from S-VHS video to digital. We have done the best we can to reduce this, but it is still there.

All of the documentaries were produced by Roger Lilley of Aarchive Films, who passed away 20 years ago. Some of the ‘modern’ footage is from between 1995 – 2000, so some of the newer footage may look different now. Also, when Roger would would use the term ‘today’, this was written back in before 2001.


Digital Remasters

Some of the video have been digitally remastered, into a 16:9 widescreen format, with updated maps, sound, colour grading and more.

The new remastered versions are online only from our Patreon Page. The DVDs are still the original format above.

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