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Plymouth to Gunnislake – From the Cab

£9.99

‘From The Cab’ is a series of films that enables the viewer to see the railway journey from the driver’s point of view. Plymouth to Gunnislake on the Tamar Valley line is an excellent place to start.

Description

DVD – Colour – 50 minutes

‘From The Cab’ is a series of films that enables the viewer to see the railway journey from the driver’s point of view. Plymouth to Gunnislake on the Tamar Valley line is an excellent place to start.

Filmed on a sunny August day in 2000, the 11.30 Wales & West commuter service hosted our camera crew for the 43 minute journey through some of the most superb scenery in the West Country. We pass through Devonport Dockyard, Keyham, St Budeaux (Victoria Road), over Tavy Viaduct into Bere Ferrers, onto Bere Alston for the change, across the Calstock Viaduct into Calstock Station and finally through to Gunnislake. The entire journey is filmed and edited digitally to obtain maximum quality.

To introduce the viewer to the line, there is a four minute history section at the start, which features snippets of archive film footage of the Bere Alston to Callington Railway.

In order to maintain authenticity the journey down to Gunnislake contains only original sounds and titles to show you where you are. Then, we return to Plymouth at 150 m.p.h. with speeded up visual effects – what takes you 43 minutes on the down run will take you only five minutes to return from a journey that you will want to see over and over again.

An Aarchive Film Production

Specifications

Narrated by Roger Lilley
Camera: Phil Lilley
Directed by Phil Lilley
In association with Wales & West Passenger Services Ltd


All the DVDs are produced, packed and sent directly from Aarchvie Films.

The original documentaries were made on S-VHS, in a 4:3 ratio, so on a standard TV/computer screen, will show black bars on both sides.

There is some very brief areas of ‘dropout’ when they were converted from S-VHS video to digital. We have done the best we can to reduce this, but it is still there.

All of the documentaries were produced by Roger Lilley of Aarchive Films, who passed away 20 years ago. Some of the ‘modern’ footage is from between 1995 – 2000, so some of the newer footage may look different now.

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